Latvian Eats Blog

rye bread

Rye Bread

Rye bread (rupjmaize, rudzu maize) always has been a staple of Latvian diet. Traditionally, Latvians ate whatever was available during the season – cereals, legumes and root vegetables, meat and...

Gingerbread

Gingerbread

Christmas in Latvia cannot be imagined without baking tray upon tray of gingerbread (piparkūkas). It is a national pastime in the days leading up to Christmas – store brought gingerbread...

yeast pancakes

Yeast pancakes

Yeast pancakes with mixed berry jam and sour cream used to be (and probably still are) dessert staple in Latvian schools. They are more time consuming to make, but the...

milk vegetable soup

Milk vegetable soup

Milk vegetable soup (piena dārzeņu zupa) is a must have for summer when carrots, potatoes, peas and cabbage are just coming in season.  But really, it can be made any...

fish with carrots and tomatoes

Fish in Carrot and Tomato Sauce

Recently I got an email from Lidija in Sydney. She wrote that growing up as a kid and teenager she would have a particular fish and tomato dish served at...

Cured salmon sandwich

Cured salmon

Salt-cured salmon (mazsālīts lasis) has been a delicacy for a while – it was served to upper classes and was highly regarded in the Late Middle Ages, while in early...

cabbage-rolls-carrot sauce

Cabbage Rolls

Cabbage rolls (kāpostu tīteņi) is one of those dishes that many like to eat but deem to challenging to make. Not so long ago I belonged to this category, however,...

beef turnovers latvian food recipe

Beef turnovers

Beef turnovers (buljona pīrādziņi, literally “broth pies”) are distant cousins of popular bacon pies (pīrāgi); they are more delicate and slightly more time consuming. Nevertheless, they are worth the effort...

sorrel soup

Sorrel Soup

Nettle, sorrel and dandelion may be considered as weeds in most parts of the world, but in Latvia all these plants are part of a diet. Every spring, as soon...

sauteed sauerkraut stoveti kaposti

Sauteed Sauerkraut

Sauteed sauerkraut (štovēti kāposti) is my “must-have” Christmas dish. Ever since I can remember, my grandma would spend most of the December 24 in the kitchen boiling, frying and sauteing...